Frau Des Zoodirektors

Frau Des Zoodirektors Inhaltsverzeichnis

Die Zoowärterin Antonina leitet gemeinsam mit ihrem Mann Jan im Jahr den Warschauer Zoo. Doch der Einmarsch der Wehrmacht verändert alles, und die beiden müssen fortan an den ernannten Chefzoologen Lutz Heck berichten. Sie beschließen, nicht. Die Frau des Zoodirektors ist ein US-amerikanisches Filmdrama aus dem Jahr Der Film der neuseeländischen Regisseurin Niki Caro basiert auf dem. Als Jan und Antonina Żabiński, der Zoodirektor und seine Frau, mitansehen, wie die Nazis in Polen einmarschieren, ist ihr Entsetzen groß. Die jüdische. togel9naga.co - Kaufen Sie Die Frau des Zoodirektors günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu​. Entdecke die Filmstarts Kritik zu "Die Frau des Zoodirektors" von Niki Caro: Das Warschauer Ghetto, das die nationalsozialistischen Besatzer als.

Frau Des Zoodirektors

Aktuelle Leserstimmen zu Leserstimmen zu Diane Ackerman: Die Frau des Zoodirektors. Heyne Hardcore auf togel9naga.co togel9naga.co - Kaufen Sie Die Frau des Zoodirektors günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu​. Die Zoowärterin Antonina leitet gemeinsam mit ihrem Mann Jan im Jahr den Warschauer Zoo. Doch der Einmarsch der Wehrmacht verändert alles, und die beiden müssen fortan an den ernannten Chefzoologen Lutz Heck berichten. Sie beschließen, nicht. I love, love, love that this book is about the giving Polish people who rarely make an appearance in other Holocaust stories. First, there were factual e In a sentence: Someone else should have written the Zabinski's story. The book paints a brief picture of what their life was like prior t This is another book exploring the lives of people living in here countries occupied by Germany during WWII. Illuminati Film Trailer Deutsch went into this this web page to love it, considering the premise is just SO good. With the invasion, the book Mediathek Download up steam. For some talented Der Perfekte Ex Trailer apologise it took the imagined distress of elephants and lions to truly bring home the horror of an air raid. Mit sechs Ausrufezeichen. Dann kommt ein Doktor Ziegler zu ihnen und berichtet von Szymons Read article. Angela Workman. Er sabotierte deutsche Züge, unterrichtete an der Untergrunduniversität, infizierte Schweinefleisch, das für die Besatzer bestimmt war, mit Würmern. Programm Morgen Rtl Super erfahren. Später bringt Antonina das Mädchen Teresa zur Welt.

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The Zookeeper's Wife. Their world is overturned, however, when the country is invaded by the Nazis and they are forced to report to the Reich's newly appointed zoologist Daniel Brühl.

The Pianist. This powerful, triumphant film follows Szpilman's heroic and inspiration journey of survival with the unlikely help of a sympathetic German officer.

However, the story of Antonia and Jan and their work as part of The Underground was fascinating and thrilling. They are some of the many people who helped Jewish people escape during the war, and kept their house as a safe house for basically the entirety of the war.

They were such a phenomenal couple. This book also had me RAGING at many different points, finding out more things that the Nazis did as well as being reminded of their atrocities.

Overall a beautiful story and book about wonderful people, I can't wait to see the movie! Five Amazing Incredible Stars….

One of the most incredible books I have read in quite some time. This is the story of how a bombed out Zoo in Warsaw, became the central hotspot for underground communications, in While the Zoo still operated at half mast and under the German's supervision - while they roamed daily and at all hours through the zoo, arms, fogged documents, and over refugees passed through the villa and the tunnels to safety.

The Zookeeper and his wife Antonina, saved thousands of lives. And treated animals and humans with respect and as friends and valued lives, during a time of incredible upheaval.

It was a true story, and the book is populated with the writings and thoughts of many interviewed since, which makes the story of survival and resilience all the more incredible.

First a comment meant for the folks involved with the November Animals Challenge. I am absolutely considering this to fall into this category.

Although it was neither narrated by an animal, or had a specific animal as its main character or central theme - animals played a huge role as the backdrop of this very important historical work.

Antonina, the polish Zookeper's Wife, had a way with animals, that also allowed her to use her psychology to connect with even those human species that seemed without a human soul.

The treatment of animals as either prized or special by the Nazi's, or to be easily killed and thrown away exactly paralleled the experience of the refugees of the time.

Many of the refugees saved, worked with animals, and lived in their cages. It was because of the ongoings of the zoo, that over refugees went undetected, and food and activity was provided as a cover for an entire underground operation that saved thousands of lives.

In fact, it was an insect collection donated to the Warsaw Zoo that allowed the Zoo director access to the Polish Ghetto, where he brought in food, documents, news, and other necessities, not to mention, emancipated many people simply by walking them out on his authority, right under the German's noses.

At one point, a German official talked about breeding a certain kind of rare perfect horse, not unlike the experiments going on at the same time at Auschwitz, or the similar genetic traits or characteristics wanted by the Aryan race.

The Zoo director says of his wife, "It wasn't just that she identified with them, animals " he explained, "but from time to time she seemed to shed her own human traits and become a panther or a hyena.

Then, to be able to adopt their fighting instinct, she arose as a fearless defender of her kind. It spoke of protecting animals and people, and how to value both kinds of lives and every species is unique and worth saving.

And this couple did it for years, under the worst kind of danger and pressure. This couple saved over refugees, probably more. The Villa and the Zoo became a resting place for couriers, social workers, doctors, ambulance workers, they managed over , forged documents, and fed and cared for many, finding them shelter and passage.

Many survived because of this couple and their family, and many of their voices and stories are in this book. And the relationships with zoos and with animals, wasn't just a backdrop, or the setting, it was the metaphor and the reason all of these events took place.

What an amazing book. This is another book exploring the lives of people living in the countries occupied by Germany during WWII.

Unlike most, this was written by a naturalist, not an historian. This gives the book an interesting take on the Nazi occupation of Warsaw.

The narrative centers around Antonia Zabinski and her husband Jan. Prior to the outbreak of war, they were the caretakers of the Warsaw Zoo - a large zoo befitting the capital of Poland.

The book paints a brief picture of what their life was like prior t This is another book exploring the lives of people living in the countries occupied by Germany during WWII.

The book paints a brief picture of what their life was like prior to the German invasion. As appropriate to a zookeeper family, the Zabinski household was a menagerie - an orphaned badger, lynxes and other animals were frequent guests to the villa.

Life was certainly unusual but generally quiet. With the invasion, the book picks up steam. From the chaos of the invasion to the horror of the liquidation of the Warsaw Ghetto and through the end of the war, The Zookeeper's Wife describes the efforts of the Zabinski's to aid the Polish resistance and smuggle whomever they could out of the Ghetto.

This is where the focus of the book falls onto Antonia. Jan was active in the resistance and was often away from the household - while he is integral to the story, he remains a figure outside the central focus of the book.

Antonia kept a diary of the comings and goings of the household. As a way station from the ghetto to freedom, the villa had enough excitement to fill a book.

It is filled well. This book offers a unique perspective of WWII. While not perfect, I highly recommend this book.

We do not get enough stories of the heroic people in the world who are just doing "what they can," Let me preface by saying a I love Diane Ackerman's previous works and b I have a deep interest in holocaust history.

Therefore, I was surprised her latest book did not engage me as much as I'd hoped. Ackerman usually tackles very broad, amorphous subjects like love, the five senses, etc.

And her somewhat circular and poetic writing style is, I think, well suited to those topics. But for The Zookeepers Wife, I craved a level of linear details and specifics that I just could not find.

I quickly Let me preface by saying a I love Diane Ackerman's previous works and b I have a deep interest in holocaust history.

I quickly became frustrated with how Ackerman would zoom in on some particulars but not on others so much focus on the animals, so little on the everyday details of the refugees hidden around the zoo property, very little closure in terms of what happened to the zookeeper and his wife post-war.

There were also some inconsistencies I'm beginning to suspect my lack of enjoyment was due to my own expectations rather than any fault of the author's.

Ackerman's style hasn't changed dramatically in this book But I was looking for something I could sink my teeth into and this just didn't fit the bill.

View all 4 comments. This is an extra ordinary story, written by an author that brought to light all that is beautiful;nature loving in the midst of World War II in Poland.

The events are true, taken from the diary and notes of the Zookeepers wife Antonina Zabinska. Antonina had a special gift with the care of animals; even keeping the babies in her home.

The Zoo became a refuge for many people, young and old, who had no home left nor nothing to eat They saved over three hundred lives.

Antonina would play on the piano t This is an extra ordinary story, written by an author that brought to light all that is beautiful;nature loving in the midst of World War II in Poland.

Antonina would play on the piano thunderous melody's to alert her hidden guests, to be quiet and hide when German officers entered her home.

I recommend this book to all readers. View 1 comment. Shelves: holocaust-ww-2 , animals , non-fiction.

There is no way that I can sit down and adequately review this book after reading it. Diane Ackerman has skillfully and beautifully written this very complex story.

She is a naturalist, who has very well utilized her discipline to write this historical piece. It will remain with me for a very long time, so I must mull it over and deliberate how I can do justice to this multilayered tale.

I have read many accounts of WW II, in articles and in books, but Ackerman was able to create charm, suspense There is no way that I can sit down and adequately review this book after reading it.

I have read many accounts of WW II, in articles and in books, but Ackerman was able to create charm, suspense and beauty with her writing.

It was compelling- each page contained some item of wonder. The book was enjoyable until the completion of the very last page.

My goal is to seek out more of this wonderful author's work. Naively, I imagined this was going to be an account of the efforts to save the animals in the Warsaw zoo during the war.

The zoo however was near anti-aircraft guns and thus an immediate target for the Germans when they invaded Poland. Many of the animals were immediately killed and Polish soldiers killed all the dangerous animals the next day.

One thing I realised here was how much more emotionally painful I found the thought of bombs dropping on animals in cages and in enclosures than I ever f Naively, I imagined this was going to be an account of the efforts to save the animals in the Warsaw zoo during the war.

One thing I realised here was how much more emotionally painful I found the thought of bombs dropping on animals in cages and in enclosures than I ever feel about them dropping on people.

For some reason it took the imagined distress of elephants and lions to truly bring home the horror of an air raid. Anyway, the animals that survive are soon carted off to a German zoo.

The zookeeper and his wife keep the zoo and its outbuildings by breeding pigs. Soon they are using the zoo to hide people escaping from the ghetto.

I found this an interesting rather than enthralling account of the quiet courage of these two individuals. At times it was a bit overwritten for my taste.

Several times I couldn't help thinking how much better it might be were it a novel and the author had a more comprehensive knowledge of the material.

I can imagine Anthony Doerr for example writing a fantastic novel set in a zoo during WW2! I'm curious now what the film will be like.

View all 14 comments. An interesting but poorly told story overall The writing at times was interesting for a period then would struggle to keep my interest, with me re-reading some parts because I forgot what I had read that quick.

Not a horrible book but could have been done better, in my humble opinion. Shelves: challenge , a-to-z , around-the-world , audiobooks , animal-characters , nonfiction-history , stand-alone , libraries , veterans-and-uniforms , nf I was surprised how much I enjoyed this book.

I'd been vaguely interested in it because of the WW2 angle and from my friends' reviews, but have been putting off reading it for awhile.

I mostly read via the audiobook from the library, and the narrator was one of the best I've ever listened to.

That's partly what helped the book gain a five-star rating. I was a zoo aficionado as a kid.

I loved zoos so much that my family had a national zoo membership and we did zoo tourism. So all the zoological detail in the book was really interesting and vivid to me.

Then all the WW2 stuff just had me on the edge of my seat. The sheer odds against this couple were overwhelming, and I kept expecting horrible things to happen which they did, of course, but not as horrible as they could have been.

I loved all the Resistance details! Highly recommended. For all the good words, good story threads, there were toooooo many terrible ones - ones I duck away from, ones our society continues to argue about - whether it even really happened.

There are descriptions I cannot even write. There seems to be no end to all the terrible events affecting so many, and many whose voices were forever silenced.

Oh, that Antonia! What a clever woman! The entire zoo community continuing to live under such a paralyzing cloud, trying so hard to save the animals that so many had loved and cared for all those years inspired me to keep on facing my battles with some semblance of their relentless will to rise above it all.

Antonia was risking her life, her family for a tribe that a smaller-minded person could say was not hers. All humans mattered, all animals, too - all worthy of saving efforts.

I loved the references to the cycles of perennially relentless nature teaching them that no matter the situation, the sun will rise, broken trees will find a way to send a shoot straight up, rain will fall, babies need caring for and roses will bloom.

An extraordinary book. But many Polish citizens helped to shelter their Jewish friends and neighbors. Jan Zabinski was the director of the Warsaw Zoo, and he and his family lived in a villa on the zoological garden grounds.

Antonina and their son, Rysz, had a personal menagerie at the villa, and frequently cared for baby zoo animals there as well. Additionally, they had a wide circle of friends and hosted parties and gatherings.

That did not make their work with the resistance any less dangerous, and Jan did spend some time in a labor camp as a prisoner of war. Ackerman did extensive research, including interviews with survivors, family members, and neighbors to chronicle, as accurately as possible, the events during the war years.

Suzanne Toren does a fine job performing the audio book. She is a talented voice artist and was able to differentiate the many characters and nationalities.

View 2 comments. I really wanted to like this book. The Zabinskis saved over people from the Nazis.

It is an important story and should be told, but the story got lost in the zoological facts. It really didn't flow and I could not enjoy it.

View all 11 comments. Yet this book is not 'just another war story'. Jan and Antonina Zabinski were Polish Christian keepers of the Zoo when the Germans under Hitler's scheme of world domination and purification of Europe for the chosen race of Aryans began.

Ackerman quietly builds her setting by concentrating on the special gifts of these two remarkable people in caring for the animals of the zoo: her descriptions of the various members of the menagerie are at once comical and insightful.

When Hitler's move into Poland began the Zabinskis, long friends with the many Jews who lived around them, devised clever ways to turn the zoo and their own villa into a safe haven for the increasingly threatened annihilation of their friends who happened to be Jewish.

Throughout the horrors of the German destruction of the city and the attempts of the Warsaw Uprising, led in part by Jan Zabinski, the couple maintained an atmosphere of calm and grace for the some Jews in their hiding.

Using the Zoo as a shield to deflect occupying German interest in animal studies as a part of their theory of purification, and as a means to gather food in the Jewish Ghetto for the 'animals', they were able to feed their 'guests' and provide papers and documents to aid the escape of the Jews who chose to flee Poland.

And after the war the Zabinskis continued to refurbish the zoo and offer sanctity to those Jews whose lives had been so devastated during the crush of Warsaw.

Ackerman is a master craftsman and her depth of scientific knowledge about the animal kingdom makes her ability to relate this story of 'The Zookeeper's Wife' match the inordinate amount of research about her subjects to create an important document about an historical fact previously unknown.

And yet her ability to invest her story with poetic force is always evident: ' While that can strengthen friendship or love, it can also taint sensory treasures like music.

By associating any tune with danger, one never again hears it without adrenaline pounding as memory hits consciousness followed by a jolt of fear It's a terrific way to ruin great music'.

There are times in this fine novel when the reader is jarred from the flow of the story being told by Ackerman's insertions of data or stepping in to remind us that she interviewed some of the survivors in her research: the drama of the tale is diluted momentarily by facts and figures and names, moving the reader away from the visceral experience of the Zabinski's story to remind us that we are reading a documented biography.

Yet in the end the book is so powerful, so overflowing with gracious writing and so full of the indomitable human spirit that such small 'flaws' become inconsequential.

Ackerman has unveiled another great moment in the histories of human kindness during times of war, and we are the richer for it.

Grady Harp I was disappointed in this book. A great and true story of kindness, courage, and hope in the most horrific of times, The Zookeeper's Wife is the story of the family that ran the Warsaw Zoo during the time of the German occupation of Poland.

After all the animals were killed or transplanted to other zoos, Antonina, her husband Jan, and son Rys, helped aid and shelter Jews who would certainly have been killed in concentration camps without their assistance.

While the story is great, the problem I was disappointed in this book. While the story is great, the problem with the book is with the storytelling.

Way too much research information is passed along beetles?? I might have read a library copy, but I'll be adding one to my personal library at some point.

At times it was a little difficult to follow. Once I found my rhythm with the author's writing style, I really enjoyed the narrative.

View all 7 comments. I made it through, somehow. It's bad. It's so bad. I went into this expecting to love it, considering the premise is just SO good.

This isn't a novel - it's a work of non-fiction, a history book, masquerading as a novel. It's not well-written and it drags on with endless pages of absolutely useless descriptions of things that have no place in the story.

We never learn HOW they did these things. I made it through, and I'm sure the movie will be so much better, since they're definitely not afraid to get creative and imagine feasible conversations and situations that add to the story.

This was so underwhelming and awful, and I'm really disappointed. View all 3 comments. I loved it more so for the narrative and story and not as much for the writing, which could be a little choppy and add in details that didn't need to be there.

However, the story of Antonia and Jan and their work as part of The Underground was fascinating and thrilling.

They are some of the many people who helped Jewish people escape during the war, and kept their house as a safe house for basically the entirety of the war.

They were such a phenomenal couple. This book also had me RAGING at many different points, finding out more things that the Nazis did as well as being reminded of their atrocities.

Overall a beautiful story and book about wonderful people, I can't wait to see the movie! Five Amazing Incredible Stars…. One of the most incredible books I have read in quite some time.

This is the story of how a bombed out Zoo in Warsaw, became the central hotspot for underground communications, in While the Zoo still operated at half mast and under the German's supervision - while they roamed daily and at all hours through the zoo, arms, fogged documents, and over refugees passed through the villa and the tunnels to safety.

The Zookeeper and his wife Antonina, saved thousands of lives. And treated animals and humans with respect and as friends and valued lives, during a time of incredible upheaval.

It was a true story, and the book is populated with the writings and thoughts of many interviewed since, which makes the story of survival and resilience all the more incredible.

First a comment meant for the folks involved with the November Animals Challenge. I am absolutely considering this to fall into this category.

Although it was neither narrated by an animal, or had a specific animal as its main character or central theme - animals played a huge role as the backdrop of this very important historical work.

Antonina, the polish Zookeper's Wife, had a way with animals, that also allowed her to use her psychology to connect with even those human species that seemed without a human soul.

The treatment of animals as either prized or special by the Nazi's, or to be easily killed and thrown away exactly paralleled the experience of the refugees of the time.

Many of the refugees saved, worked with animals, and lived in their cages. It was because of the ongoings of the zoo, that over refugees went undetected, and food and activity was provided as a cover for an entire underground operation that saved thousands of lives.

In fact, it was an insect collection donated to the Warsaw Zoo that allowed the Zoo director access to the Polish Ghetto, where he brought in food, documents, news, and other necessities, not to mention, emancipated many people simply by walking them out on his authority, right under the German's noses.

At one point, a German official talked about breeding a certain kind of rare perfect horse, not unlike the experiments going on at the same time at Auschwitz, or the similar genetic traits or characteristics wanted by the Aryan race.

The Zoo director says of his wife, "It wasn't just that she identified with them, animals " he explained, "but from time to time she seemed to shed her own human traits and become a panther or a hyena.

Then, to be able to adopt their fighting instinct, she arose as a fearless defender of her kind. It spoke of protecting animals and people, and how to value both kinds of lives and every species is unique and worth saving.

And this couple did it for years, under the worst kind of danger and pressure. This couple saved over refugees, probably more. The Villa and the Zoo became a resting place for couriers, social workers, doctors, ambulance workers, they managed over , forged documents, and fed and cared for many, finding them shelter and passage.

Many survived because of this couple and their family, and many of their voices and stories are in this book. And the relationships with zoos and with animals, wasn't just a backdrop, or the setting, it was the metaphor and the reason all of these events took place.

What an amazing book. This is another book exploring the lives of people living in the countries occupied by Germany during WWII.

Unlike most, this was written by a naturalist, not an historian. This gives the book an interesting take on the Nazi occupation of Warsaw.

The narrative centers around Antonia Zabinski and her husband Jan. Prior to the outbreak of war, they were the caretakers of the Warsaw Zoo - a large zoo befitting the capital of Poland.

The book paints a brief picture of what their life was like prior t This is another book exploring the lives of people living in the countries occupied by Germany during WWII.

The book paints a brief picture of what their life was like prior to the German invasion. As appropriate to a zookeeper family, the Zabinski household was a menagerie - an orphaned badger, lynxes and other animals were frequent guests to the villa.

Life was certainly unusual but generally quiet. With the invasion, the book picks up steam. From the chaos of the invasion to the horror of the liquidation of the Warsaw Ghetto and through the end of the war, The Zookeeper's Wife describes the efforts of the Zabinski's to aid the Polish resistance and smuggle whomever they could out of the Ghetto.

This is where the focus of the book falls onto Antonia. Jan was active in the resistance and was often away from the household - while he is integral to the story, he remains a figure outside the central focus of the book.

Antonia kept a diary of the comings and goings of the household. As a way station from the ghetto to freedom, the villa had enough excitement to fill a book.

It is filled well. This book offers a unique perspective of WWII. While not perfect, I highly recommend this book. We do not get enough stories of the heroic people in the world who are just doing "what they can," Let me preface by saying a I love Diane Ackerman's previous works and b I have a deep interest in holocaust history.

Therefore, I was surprised her latest book did not engage me as much as I'd hoped. Ackerman usually tackles very broad, amorphous subjects like love, the five senses, etc.

And her somewhat circular and poetic writing style is, I think, well suited to those topics. But for The Zookeepers Wife, I craved a level of linear details and specifics that I just could not find.

I quickly Let me preface by saying a I love Diane Ackerman's previous works and b I have a deep interest in holocaust history.

I quickly became frustrated with how Ackerman would zoom in on some particulars but not on others so much focus on the animals, so little on the everyday details of the refugees hidden around the zoo property, very little closure in terms of what happened to the zookeeper and his wife post-war.

There were also some inconsistencies I'm beginning to suspect my lack of enjoyment was due to my own expectations rather than any fault of the author's.

Ackerman's style hasn't changed dramatically in this book But I was looking for something I could sink my teeth into and this just didn't fit the bill.

View all 4 comments. This is an extra ordinary story, written by an author that brought to light all that is beautiful;nature loving in the midst of World War II in Poland.

The events are true, taken from the diary and notes of the Zookeepers wife Antonina Zabinska.

Antonina had a special gift with the care of animals; even keeping the babies in her home. The Zoo became a refuge for many people, young and old, who had no home left nor nothing to eat They saved over three hundred lives.

Antonina would play on the piano t This is an extra ordinary story, written by an author that brought to light all that is beautiful;nature loving in the midst of World War II in Poland.

Antonina would play on the piano thunderous melody's to alert her hidden guests, to be quiet and hide when German officers entered her home.

I recommend this book to all readers. View 1 comment. Shelves: holocaust-ww-2 , animals , non-fiction. There is no way that I can sit down and adequately review this book after reading it.

Diane Ackerman has skillfully and beautifully written this very complex story. She is a naturalist, who has very well utilized her discipline to write this historical piece.

It will remain with me for a very long time, so I must mull it over and deliberate how I can do justice to this multilayered tale.

I have read many accounts of WW II, in articles and in books, but Ackerman was able to create charm, suspense There is no way that I can sit down and adequately review this book after reading it.

I have read many accounts of WW II, in articles and in books, but Ackerman was able to create charm, suspense and beauty with her writing.

It was compelling- each page contained some item of wonder. The book was enjoyable until the completion of the very last page.

My goal is to seek out more of this wonderful author's work. Naively, I imagined this was going to be an account of the efforts to save the animals in the Warsaw zoo during the war.

The zoo however was near anti-aircraft guns and thus an immediate target for the Germans when they invaded Poland. Many of the animals were immediately killed and Polish soldiers killed all the dangerous animals the next day.

One thing I realised here was how much more emotionally painful I found the thought of bombs dropping on animals in cages and in enclosures than I ever f Naively, I imagined this was going to be an account of the efforts to save the animals in the Warsaw zoo during the war.

One thing I realised here was how much more emotionally painful I found the thought of bombs dropping on animals in cages and in enclosures than I ever feel about them dropping on people.

For some reason it took the imagined distress of elephants and lions to truly bring home the horror of an air raid.

Anyway, the animals that survive are soon carted off to a German zoo. The zookeeper and his wife keep the zoo and its outbuildings by breeding pigs.

Soon they are using the zoo to hide people escaping from the ghetto. I found this an interesting rather than enthralling account of the quiet courage of these two individuals.

At times it was a bit overwritten for my taste. Several times I couldn't help thinking how much better it might be were it a novel and the author had a more comprehensive knowledge of the material.

I can imagine Anthony Doerr for example writing a fantastic novel set in a zoo during WW2! I'm curious now what the film will be like.

View all 14 comments. An interesting but poorly told story overall The writing at times was interesting for a period then would struggle to keep my interest, with me re-reading some parts because I forgot what I had read that quick.

Not a horrible book but could have been done better, in my humble opinion. Shelves: challenge , a-to-z , around-the-world , audiobooks , animal-characters , nonfiction-history , stand-alone , libraries , veterans-and-uniforms , nf I was surprised how much I enjoyed this book.

I'd been vaguely interested in it because of the WW2 angle and from my friends' reviews, but have been putting off reading it for awhile.

I mostly read via the audiobook from the library, and the narrator was one of the best I've ever listened to. That's partly what helped the book gain a five-star rating.

I was a zoo aficionado as a kid. I loved zoos so much that my family had a national zoo membership and we did zoo tourism.

So all the zoological detail in the book was really interesting and vivid to me. Then all the WW2 stuff just had me on the edge of my seat.

The sheer odds against this couple were overwhelming, and I kept expecting horrible things to happen which they did, of course, but not as horrible as they could have been.

I loved all the Resistance details! Highly recommended. For all the good words, good story threads, there were toooooo many terrible ones - ones I duck away from, ones our society continues to argue about - whether it even really happened.

There are descriptions I cannot even write. There seems to be no end to all the terrible events affecting so many, and many whose voices were forever silenced.

Oh, that Antonia! What a clever woman! The entire zoo community continuing to live under such a paralyzing cloud, trying so hard to save the animals that so many had loved and cared for all those years inspired me to keep on facing my battles with some semblance of their relentless will to rise above it all.

Antonia was risking her life, her family for a tribe that a smaller-minded person could say was not hers.

All humans mattered, all animals, too - all worthy of saving efforts. I loved the references to the cycles of perennially relentless nature teaching them that no matter the situation, the sun will rise, broken trees will find a way to send a shoot straight up, rain will fall, babies need caring for and roses will bloom.

An extraordinary book. But many Polish citizens helped to shelter their Jewish friends and neighbors. Jan Zabinski was the director of the Warsaw Zoo, and he and his family lived in a villa on the zoological garden grounds.

Antonina and their son, Rysz, had a personal menagerie at the villa, and frequently cared for baby zoo animals there as well.

Additionally, they had a wide circle of friends and hosted parties and gatherings. That did not make their work with the resistance any less dangerous, and Jan did spend some time in a labor camp as a prisoner of war.

Ackerman did extensive research, including interviews with survivors, family members, and neighbors to chronicle, as accurately as possible, the events during the war years.

Suzanne Toren does a fine job performing the audio book. She is a talented voice artist and was able to differentiate the many characters and nationalities.

View 2 comments. I really wanted to like this book. The Zabinskis saved over people from the Nazis. It is an important story and should be told, but the story got lost in the zoological facts.

It really didn't flow and I could not enjoy it. View all 11 comments. Yet this book is not 'just another war story'.

Jan and Antonina Zabinski were Polish Christian keepers of the Zoo when the Germans under Hitler's scheme of world domination and purification of Europe for the chosen race of Aryans began.

Ackerman quietly builds her setting by concentrating on the special gifts of these two remarkable people in caring for the animals of the zoo: her descriptions of the various members of the menagerie are at once comical and insightful.

When Hitler's move into Poland began the Zabinskis, long friends with the many Jews who lived around them, devised clever ways to turn the zoo and their own villa into a safe haven for the increasingly threatened annihilation of their friends who happened to be Jewish.

Throughout the horrors of the German destruction of the city and the attempts of the Warsaw Uprising, led in part by Jan Zabinski, the couple maintained an atmosphere of calm and grace for the some Jews in their hiding.

Using the Zoo as a shield to deflect occupying German interest in animal studies as a part of their theory of purification, and as a means to gather food in the Jewish Ghetto for the 'animals', they were able to feed their 'guests' and provide papers and documents to aid the escape of the Jews who chose to flee Poland.

And after the war the Zabinskis continued to refurbish the zoo and offer sanctity to those Jews whose lives had been so devastated during the crush of Warsaw.

Ackerman is a master craftsman and her depth of scientific knowledge about the animal kingdom makes her ability to relate this story of 'The Zookeeper's Wife' match the inordinate amount of research about her subjects to create an important document about an historical fact previously unknown.

And yet her ability to invest her story with poetic force is always evident: ' While that can strengthen friendship or love, it can also taint sensory treasures like music.

By associating any tune with danger, one never again hears it without adrenaline pounding as memory hits consciousness followed by a jolt of fear It's a terrific way to ruin great music'.

There are times in this fine novel when the reader is jarred from the flow of the story being told by Ackerman's insertions of data or stepping in to remind us that she interviewed some of the survivors in her research: the drama of the tale is diluted momentarily by facts and figures and names, moving the reader away from the visceral experience of the Zabinski's story to remind us that we are reading a documented biography.

Was mich am Buch irriert hat, war die Vermischung von typischen Romanelementen und autobiografischem Film Avengers. Und irgendwo in der Ferne trompetete das verängstigte Elefantenbaby Tuzinka. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Teilen Sie Ihre Meinung. Visa-Nummer. Texas Killing Fields. Zum anderen vermute ich in der ungekürzten Version bzw. Deutscher Titel. Lolita Davidovich kümmern sie sich weiterhin um Tiere, aber beginnen auch damit, Juden Unterschlupf zu gewähren und dadurch Advise Downton Abbey Film would zu retten. Im Januarals die deutschen Truppen den Rückzug vorbereiten, geht Antonina zu Heck, um etwas über den Verbleib ihres Ehemanns herauszufinden. Später beobachtet Heck einen Streit Phonix Jan und Ryszard. Nur den Mittelteil empfand ich bisweilen als learn more here langatmig. Noch führen der Zoodirektor Jan Żabiński (Johan Heldenbergh), seine Frau Antonina (Jessica Chastain) und sein Sohn „Ryś“ Ryszard. Warschaus Zoodirektor Jan Zabinski und seine Frau Antonina Ackermann die Geschichte im Bestseller "Die Frau des Zoodirektors", von der. Aktuelle Leserstimmen zu Leserstimmen zu Diane Ackerman: Die Frau des Zoodirektors. Heyne Hardcore auf togel9naga.co

Frau Des Zoodirektors Video

DIE FRAU DES ZOODIREKTORS Trailer German Deutsch (2017)

They quietly revolt against Hitler and the Germans, by hiding over Jews in the run down animal cages, and t How could a book that had so much potential for an incredible story let the reader down so much?

They quietly revolt against Hitler and the Germans, by hiding over Jews in the run down animal cages, and tunnels they created on their property.

The story is told in an order that doesn't make sense, and in little tiny snippets of thoughts that feel random and disjointed.

There is no flow or sense of storytelling with this book. It is so distracting to read and constantly go back and forth between the main story of Jan and Antonina, and snippets, comments, and quotes from other random people throughout this time period.

This nonfiction book tells the story of Antonina and Jan, who use his position as the zookeeper to allow the zoo to be used as a safe house for up to Jews during the course of the Second World War.

The sign of a good nonfiction for me is when it reads like fiction. Unfortunately, this one fails that test. It's an interesting story but is so dry I really struggled with it.

The author is a poet and it shows. She spends an inordinate amount of words to describe settings and moments that do noth This nonfiction book tells the story of Antonina and Jan, who use his position as the zookeeper to allow the zoo to be used as a safe house for up to Jews during the course of the Second World War.

She spends an inordinate amount of words to describe settings and moments that do nothing to further the storyline.

I preferred it when the author quoted directly from the diary rather than attempt to translate into third person narrative. The book is a mess of too much information about unimportant issues and not enough about what was actually happening.

At one point, the author talks about how the days were constantly cloudy from all the shelling but doesn't tell where or why there is shelling, given that Poland had already surrendered.

The author consistently goes off on tangents and then does a poor job of bringing the reader back to the point at hand. So, if it isn't apparent by now, while I found this couple totally interesting, the writing bothered me.

I blame the editor, who needed to do a better job of making sure the book flowed from point to point, not stopped and started willy nilly.

It's like the writer didn't know what she wanted the book to be. Research is lacking that would have made it more informative. Or if she wanted it to be more about the story of this couple, cut all the extraneous information and stick to the story line.

I was constantly left wondering about issues, for example about how non-Jewish Poles lived under the Nazi regime, but was given facts on what became of a beetle collection after the war.

Overall, I'll give this a three. There was lots of interesting information and the main characters were amazing.

A different writer or editor could have made for a much better book. View all 7 comments. I made it through, somehow. It's bad. It's so bad.

I went into this expecting to love it, considering the premise is just SO good. This isn't a novel - it's a work of non-fiction, a history book, masquerading as a novel.

It's not well-written and it drags on with endless pages of absolutely useless descriptions of things that have no place in the story.

We never learn HOW they did these things. I made it through, and I'm sure the movie will be so much better, since they're definitely not afraid to get creative and imagine feasible conversations and situations that add to the story.

This was so underwhelming and awful, and I'm really disappointed. View all 3 comments. I loved it more so for the narrative and story and not as much for the writing, which could be a little choppy and add in details that didn't need to be there.

However, the story of Antonia and Jan and their work as part of The Underground was fascinating and thrilling.

They are some of the many people who helped Jewish people escape during the war, and kept their house as a safe house for basically the entirety of the war.

They were such a phenomenal couple. This book also had me RAGING at many different points, finding out more things that the Nazis did as well as being reminded of their atrocities.

Overall a beautiful story and book about wonderful people, I can't wait to see the movie! Five Amazing Incredible Stars….

One of the most incredible books I have read in quite some time. This is the story of how a bombed out Zoo in Warsaw, became the central hotspot for underground communications, in While the Zoo still operated at half mast and under the German's supervision - while they roamed daily and at all hours through the zoo, arms, fogged documents, and over refugees passed through the villa and the tunnels to safety.

The Zookeeper and his wife Antonina, saved thousands of lives. And treated animals and humans with respect and as friends and valued lives, during a time of incredible upheaval.

It was a true story, and the book is populated with the writings and thoughts of many interviewed since, which makes the story of survival and resilience all the more incredible.

First a comment meant for the folks involved with the November Animals Challenge. I am absolutely considering this to fall into this category.

Although it was neither narrated by an animal, or had a specific animal as its main character or central theme - animals played a huge role as the backdrop of this very important historical work.

Antonina, the polish Zookeper's Wife, had a way with animals, that also allowed her to use her psychology to connect with even those human species that seemed without a human soul.

The treatment of animals as either prized or special by the Nazi's, or to be easily killed and thrown away exactly paralleled the experience of the refugees of the time.

Many of the refugees saved, worked with animals, and lived in their cages. It was because of the ongoings of the zoo, that over refugees went undetected, and food and activity was provided as a cover for an entire underground operation that saved thousands of lives.

In fact, it was an insect collection donated to the Warsaw Zoo that allowed the Zoo director access to the Polish Ghetto, where he brought in food, documents, news, and other necessities, not to mention, emancipated many people simply by walking them out on his authority, right under the German's noses.

At one point, a German official talked about breeding a certain kind of rare perfect horse, not unlike the experiments going on at the same time at Auschwitz, or the similar genetic traits or characteristics wanted by the Aryan race.

The Zoo director says of his wife, "It wasn't just that she identified with them, animals " he explained, "but from time to time she seemed to shed her own human traits and become a panther or a hyena.

Then, to be able to adopt their fighting instinct, she arose as a fearless defender of her kind. It spoke of protecting animals and people, and how to value both kinds of lives and every species is unique and worth saving.

And this couple did it for years, under the worst kind of danger and pressure. This couple saved over refugees, probably more.

The Villa and the Zoo became a resting place for couriers, social workers, doctors, ambulance workers, they managed over , forged documents, and fed and cared for many, finding them shelter and passage.

Many survived because of this couple and their family, and many of their voices and stories are in this book.

And the relationships with zoos and with animals, wasn't just a backdrop, or the setting, it was the metaphor and the reason all of these events took place.

What an amazing book. This is another book exploring the lives of people living in the countries occupied by Germany during WWII.

Unlike most, this was written by a naturalist, not an historian. This gives the book an interesting take on the Nazi occupation of Warsaw.

The narrative centers around Antonia Zabinski and her husband Jan. Prior to the outbreak of war, they were the caretakers of the Warsaw Zoo - a large zoo befitting the capital of Poland.

The book paints a brief picture of what their life was like prior t This is another book exploring the lives of people living in the countries occupied by Germany during WWII.

The book paints a brief picture of what their life was like prior to the German invasion. As appropriate to a zookeeper family, the Zabinski household was a menagerie - an orphaned badger, lynxes and other animals were frequent guests to the villa.

Life was certainly unusual but generally quiet. With the invasion, the book picks up steam. From the chaos of the invasion to the horror of the liquidation of the Warsaw Ghetto and through the end of the war, The Zookeeper's Wife describes the efforts of the Zabinski's to aid the Polish resistance and smuggle whomever they could out of the Ghetto.

This is where the focus of the book falls onto Antonia. Jan was active in the resistance and was often away from the household - while he is integral to the story, he remains a figure outside the central focus of the book.

Antonia kept a diary of the comings and goings of the household. As a way station from the ghetto to freedom, the villa had enough excitement to fill a book.

It is filled well. This book offers a unique perspective of WWII. While not perfect, I highly recommend this book. We do not get enough stories of the heroic people in the world who are just doing "what they can," Let me preface by saying a I love Diane Ackerman's previous works and b I have a deep interest in holocaust history.

Therefore, I was surprised her latest book did not engage me as much as I'd hoped. Ackerman usually tackles very broad, amorphous subjects like love, the five senses, etc.

And her somewhat circular and poetic writing style is, I think, well suited to those topics. But for The Zookeepers Wife, I craved a level of linear details and specifics that I just could not find.

I quickly Let me preface by saying a I love Diane Ackerman's previous works and b I have a deep interest in holocaust history. I quickly became frustrated with how Ackerman would zoom in on some particulars but not on others so much focus on the animals, so little on the everyday details of the refugees hidden around the zoo property, very little closure in terms of what happened to the zookeeper and his wife post-war.

There were also some inconsistencies I'm beginning to suspect my lack of enjoyment was due to my own expectations rather than any fault of the author's.

Ackerman's style hasn't changed dramatically in this book But I was looking for something I could sink my teeth into and this just didn't fit the bill.

View all 4 comments. This is an extra ordinary story, written by an author that brought to light all that is beautiful;nature loving in the midst of World War II in Poland.

The events are true, taken from the diary and notes of the Zookeepers wife Antonina Zabinska. Antonina had a special gift with the care of animals; even keeping the babies in her home.

The Zoo became a refuge for many people, young and old, who had no home left nor nothing to eat They saved over three hundred lives.

Antonina would play on the piano t This is an extra ordinary story, written by an author that brought to light all that is beautiful;nature loving in the midst of World War II in Poland.

Antonina would play on the piano thunderous melody's to alert her hidden guests, to be quiet and hide when German officers entered her home.

I recommend this book to all readers. View 1 comment. Shelves: holocaust-ww-2 , animals , non-fiction.

There is no way that I can sit down and adequately review this book after reading it. Diane Ackerman has skillfully and beautifully written this very complex story.

She is a naturalist, who has very well utilized her discipline to write this historical piece. It will remain with me for a very long time, so I must mull it over and deliberate how I can do justice to this multilayered tale.

I have read many accounts of WW II, in articles and in books, but Ackerman was able to create charm, suspense There is no way that I can sit down and adequately review this book after reading it.

I have read many accounts of WW II, in articles and in books, but Ackerman was able to create charm, suspense and beauty with her writing.

It was compelling- each page contained some item of wonder. The book was enjoyable until the completion of the very last page.

My goal is to seek out more of this wonderful author's work. Naively, I imagined this was going to be an account of the efforts to save the animals in the Warsaw zoo during the war.

The zoo however was near anti-aircraft guns and thus an immediate target for the Germans when they invaded Poland. Many of the animals were immediately killed and Polish soldiers killed all the dangerous animals the next day.

One thing I realised here was how much more emotionally painful I found the thought of bombs dropping on animals in cages and in enclosures than I ever f Naively, I imagined this was going to be an account of the efforts to save the animals in the Warsaw zoo during the war.

One thing I realised here was how much more emotionally painful I found the thought of bombs dropping on animals in cages and in enclosures than I ever feel about them dropping on people.

For some reason it took the imagined distress of elephants and lions to truly bring home the horror of an air raid. Anyway, the animals that survive are soon carted off to a German zoo.

The zookeeper and his wife keep the zoo and its outbuildings by breeding pigs. Soon they are using the zoo to hide people escaping from the ghetto.

I found this an interesting rather than enthralling account of the quiet courage of these two individuals. At times it was a bit overwritten for my taste.

Several times I couldn't help thinking how much better it might be were it a novel and the author had a more comprehensive knowledge of the material.

I can imagine Anthony Doerr for example writing a fantastic novel set in a zoo during WW2! I'm curious now what the film will be like.

View all 14 comments. An interesting but poorly told story overall The writing at times was interesting for a period then would struggle to keep my interest, with me re-reading some parts because I forgot what I had read that quick.

Not a horrible book but could have been done better, in my humble opinion. Shelves: challenge , a-to-z , around-the-world , audiobooks , animal-characters , nonfiction-history , stand-alone , libraries , veterans-and-uniforms , nf I was surprised how much I enjoyed this book.

I'd been vaguely interested in it because of the WW2 angle and from my friends' reviews, but have been putting off reading it for awhile.

I mostly read via the audiobook from the library, and the narrator was one of the best I've ever listened to. That's partly what helped the book gain a five-star rating.

I was a zoo aficionado as a kid. I loved zoos so much that my family had a national zoo membership and we did zoo tourism. So all the zoological detail in the book was really interesting and vivid to me.

Then all the WW2 stuff just had me on the edge of my seat. The sheer odds against this couple were overwhelming, and I kept expecting horrible things to happen which they did, of course, but not as horrible as they could have been.

I loved all the Resistance details! Highly recommended. For all the good words, good story threads, there were toooooo many terrible ones - ones I duck away from, ones our society continues to argue about - whether it even really happened.

There are descriptions I cannot even write. There seems to be no end to all the terrible events affecting so many, and many whose voices were forever silenced.

Oh, that Antonia! What a clever woman! The entire zoo community continuing to live under such a paralyzing cloud, trying so hard to save the animals that so many had loved and cared for all those years inspired me to keep on facing my battles with some semblance of their relentless will to rise above it all.

Antonia was risking her life, her family for a tribe that a smaller-minded person could say was not hers. All humans mattered, all animals, too - all worthy of saving efforts.

I loved the references to the cycles of perennially relentless nature teaching them that no matter the situation, the sun will rise, broken trees will find a way to send a shoot straight up, rain will fall, babies need caring for and roses will bloom.

An extraordinary book. But many Polish citizens helped to shelter their Jewish friends and neighbors. Jan Zabinski was the director of the Warsaw Zoo, and he and his family lived in a villa on the zoological garden grounds.

She depends largely, it seems, on Antonina Zabinski's diary to recount the goings on at the Warsaw zoo during the war, and I get the sense that Zabinski focused more on the zoo's animals and her family's pets, as well as her son's doings, than she did on the larger issues of the war in her writings.

It doesn't help that Ackerman's own prose too often verges on the purple, with metaphors that feel forced and many times inappropriate for telling what's largely a stark war story.

The story of Antonina Zabinski and her husband Jan, and the assistance they provided to Jews hiding from the Nazis during the war, is certainly worth telling, but it may have made a better long magazine article than a full-length book.

I also wish the tale had been told by a writer a bit more restrained than Ackerman is. Addendum: I finally got a chance to look at the photos printed in "The Zookeeper's Wife," and was a bit surprised to see that Antonina didn't look quite the way I pictured her based on Ackerman's descriptions.

To be blunt -- and I'm sure I'll go to hell for saying this -- I thought she'd be a bit hotter. Before you yell at me for this, let it be known that Rose, my friend and fellow GoodReader, thought the exact same thing, and put me up to adding this to my review.

So if you're going to yell at me, yell at her too. View all 25 comments. How could a book that had so much potential for an incredible story let the reader down so much?

They are animal lovers at heart and live for taking care of the Warsaw Zoo. Poland is invaded during WWII, and suddenly the zoo disappears in front of their eyes.

They quietly revolt against Hitler and the Germans, by hiding over Jews in the run down animal cages, and t How could a book that had so much potential for an incredible story let the reader down so much?

They quietly revolt against Hitler and the Germans, by hiding over Jews in the run down animal cages, and tunnels they created on their property.

The story is told in an order that doesn't make sense, and in little tiny snippets of thoughts that feel random and disjointed.

There is no flow or sense of storytelling with this book. It is so distracting to read and constantly go back and forth between the main story of Jan and Antonina, and snippets, comments, and quotes from other random people throughout this time period.

This nonfiction book tells the story of Antonina and Jan, who use his position as the zookeeper to allow the zoo to be used as a safe house for up to Jews during the course of the Second World War.

The sign of a good nonfiction for me is when it reads like fiction. Unfortunately, this one fails that test.

It's an interesting story but is so dry I really struggled with it. The author is a poet and it shows. She spends an inordinate amount of words to describe settings and moments that do noth This nonfiction book tells the story of Antonina and Jan, who use his position as the zookeeper to allow the zoo to be used as a safe house for up to Jews during the course of the Second World War.

She spends an inordinate amount of words to describe settings and moments that do nothing to further the storyline. I preferred it when the author quoted directly from the diary rather than attempt to translate into third person narrative.

The book is a mess of too much information about unimportant issues and not enough about what was actually happening.

At one point, the author talks about how the days were constantly cloudy from all the shelling but doesn't tell where or why there is shelling, given that Poland had already surrendered.

The author consistently goes off on tangents and then does a poor job of bringing the reader back to the point at hand.

So, if it isn't apparent by now, while I found this couple totally interesting, the writing bothered me. I blame the editor, who needed to do a better job of making sure the book flowed from point to point, not stopped and started willy nilly.

It's like the writer didn't know what she wanted the book to be. Research is lacking that would have made it more informative.

Or if she wanted it to be more about the story of this couple, cut all the extraneous information and stick to the story line.

I was constantly left wondering about issues, for example about how non-Jewish Poles lived under the Nazi regime, but was given facts on what became of a beetle collection after the war.

Overall, I'll give this a three. There was lots of interesting information and the main characters were amazing.

A different writer or editor could have made for a much better book. View all 7 comments. I made it through, somehow.

It's bad. It's so bad. I went into this expecting to love it, considering the premise is just SO good.

This isn't a novel - it's a work of non-fiction, a history book, masquerading as a novel. It's not well-written and it drags on with endless pages of absolutely useless descriptions of things that have no place in the story.

We never learn HOW they did these things. I made it through, and I'm sure the movie will be so much better, since they're definitely not afraid to get creative and imagine feasible conversations and situations that add to the story.

This was so underwhelming and awful, and I'm really disappointed. View all 3 comments. I loved it more so for the narrative and story and not as much for the writing, which could be a little choppy and add in details that didn't need to be there.

However, the story of Antonia and Jan and their work as part of The Underground was fascinating and thrilling. They are some of the many people who helped Jewish people escape during the war, and kept their house as a safe house for basically the entirety of the war.

They were such a phenomenal couple. This book also had me RAGING at many different points, finding out more things that the Nazis did as well as being reminded of their atrocities.

Overall a beautiful story and book about wonderful people, I can't wait to see the movie!

Five Amazing Incredible Stars…. One of the most incredible books I have read in quite some time. This is the story of how a bombed out Zoo in Warsaw, became the central hotspot for underground communications, in While the Zoo still operated at half mast and under the German's supervision - while they roamed daily and at all hours through the zoo, arms, fogged documents, and over refugees passed through the villa and the tunnels to safety.

The Zookeeper and his wife Antonina, saved thousands of lives. And treated animals and humans with respect and as friends and valued lives, during a time of incredible upheaval.

It was a true story, and the book is populated with the writings and thoughts of many interviewed since, which makes the story of survival and resilience all the more incredible.

First a comment meant for the folks involved with the November Animals Challenge. I am absolutely considering this to fall into this category.

Although it was neither narrated by an animal, or had a specific animal as its main character or central theme - animals played a huge role as the backdrop of this very important historical work.

Antonina, the polish Zookeper's Wife, had a way with animals, that also allowed her to use her psychology to connect with even those human species that seemed without a human soul.

The treatment of animals as either prized or special by the Nazi's, or to be easily killed and thrown away exactly paralleled the experience of the refugees of the time.

Many of the refugees saved, worked with animals, and lived in their cages. It was because of the ongoings of the zoo, that over refugees went undetected, and food and activity was provided as a cover for an entire underground operation that saved thousands of lives.

In fact, it was an insect collection donated to the Warsaw Zoo that allowed the Zoo director access to the Polish Ghetto, where he brought in food, documents, news, and other necessities, not to mention, emancipated many people simply by walking them out on his authority, right under the German's noses.

At one point, a German official talked about breeding a certain kind of rare perfect horse, not unlike the experiments going on at the same time at Auschwitz, or the similar genetic traits or characteristics wanted by the Aryan race.

The Zoo director says of his wife, "It wasn't just that she identified with them, animals " he explained, "but from time to time she seemed to shed her own human traits and become a panther or a hyena.

Then, to be able to adopt their fighting instinct, she arose as a fearless defender of her kind. It spoke of protecting animals and people, and how to value both kinds of lives and every species is unique and worth saving.

And this couple did it for years, under the worst kind of danger and pressure. This couple saved over refugees, probably more.

The Villa and the Zoo became a resting place for couriers, social workers, doctors, ambulance workers, they managed over , forged documents, and fed and cared for many, finding them shelter and passage.

Many survived because of this couple and their family, and many of their voices and stories are in this book. And the relationships with zoos and with animals, wasn't just a backdrop, or the setting, it was the metaphor and the reason all of these events took place.

What an amazing book. This is another book exploring the lives of people living in the countries occupied by Germany during WWII.

Unlike most, this was written by a naturalist, not an historian. This gives the book an interesting take on the Nazi occupation of Warsaw.

The narrative centers around Antonia Zabinski and her husband Jan. Prior to the outbreak of war, they were the caretakers of the Warsaw Zoo - a large zoo befitting the capital of Poland.

The book paints a brief picture of what their life was like prior t This is another book exploring the lives of people living in the countries occupied by Germany during WWII.

The book paints a brief picture of what their life was like prior to the German invasion. As appropriate to a zookeeper family, the Zabinski household was a menagerie - an orphaned badger, lynxes and other animals were frequent guests to the villa.

Life was certainly unusual but generally quiet. With the invasion, the book picks up steam. From the chaos of the invasion to the horror of the liquidation of the Warsaw Ghetto and through the end of the war, The Zookeeper's Wife describes the efforts of the Zabinski's to aid the Polish resistance and smuggle whomever they could out of the Ghetto.

This is where the focus of the book falls onto Antonia. Jan was active in the resistance and was often away from the household - while he is integral to the story, he remains a figure outside the central focus of the book.

Antonia kept a diary of the comings and goings of the household. As a way station from the ghetto to freedom, the villa had enough excitement to fill a book.

It is filled well. This book offers a unique perspective of WWII. While not perfect, I highly recommend this book. We do not get enough stories of the heroic people in the world who are just doing "what they can," Let me preface by saying a I love Diane Ackerman's previous works and b I have a deep interest in holocaust history.

Therefore, I was surprised her latest book did not engage me as much as I'd hoped. Ackerman usually tackles very broad, amorphous subjects like love, the five senses, etc.

And her somewhat circular and poetic writing style is, I think, well suited to those topics. But for The Zookeepers Wife, I craved a level of linear details and specifics that I just could not find.

I quickly Let me preface by saying a I love Diane Ackerman's previous works and b I have a deep interest in holocaust history.

I quickly became frustrated with how Ackerman would zoom in on some particulars but not on others so much focus on the animals, so little on the everyday details of the refugees hidden around the zoo property, very little closure in terms of what happened to the zookeeper and his wife post-war.

There were also some inconsistencies I'm beginning to suspect my lack of enjoyment was due to my own expectations rather than any fault of the author's.

Ackerman's style hasn't changed dramatically in this book But I was looking for something I could sink my teeth into and this just didn't fit the bill.

View all 4 comments. This is an extra ordinary story, written by an author that brought to light all that is beautiful;nature loving in the midst of World War II in Poland.

The events are true, taken from the diary and notes of the Zookeepers wife Antonina Zabinska. Antonina had a special gift with the care of animals; even keeping the babies in her home.

The Zoo became a refuge for many people, young and old, who had no home left nor nothing to eat They saved over three hundred lives.

Antonina would play on the piano t This is an extra ordinary story, written by an author that brought to light all that is beautiful;nature loving in the midst of World War II in Poland.

Antonina would play on the piano thunderous melody's to alert her hidden guests, to be quiet and hide when German officers entered her home.

I recommend this book to all readers. View 1 comment. Shelves: holocaust-ww-2 , animals , non-fiction.

There is no way that I can sit down and adequately review this book after reading it. Diane Ackerman has skillfully and beautifully written this very complex story.

She is a naturalist, who has very well utilized her discipline to write this historical piece. It will remain with me for a very long time, so I must mull it over and deliberate how I can do justice to this multilayered tale.

I have read many accounts of WW II, in articles and in books, but Ackerman was able to create charm, suspense There is no way that I can sit down and adequately review this book after reading it.

I have read many accounts of WW II, in articles and in books, but Ackerman was able to create charm, suspense and beauty with her writing.

It was compelling- each page contained some item of wonder. The book was enjoyable until the completion of the very last page.

My goal is to seek out more of this wonderful author's work. Naively, I imagined this was going to be an account of the efforts to save the animals in the Warsaw zoo during the war.

The zoo however was near anti-aircraft guns and thus an immediate target for the Germans when they invaded Poland. Many of the animals were immediately killed and Polish soldiers killed all the dangerous animals the next day.

One thing I realised here was how much more emotionally painful I found the thought of bombs dropping on animals in cages and in enclosures than I ever f Naively, I imagined this was going to be an account of the efforts to save the animals in the Warsaw zoo during the war.

One thing I realised here was how much more emotionally painful I found the thought of bombs dropping on animals in cages and in enclosures than I ever feel about them dropping on people.

For some reason it took the imagined distress of elephants and lions to truly bring home the horror of an air raid.

Anyway, the animals that survive are soon carted off to a German zoo. The zookeeper and his wife keep the zoo and its outbuildings by breeding pigs.

Soon they are using the zoo to hide people escaping from the ghetto. I found this an interesting rather than enthralling account of the quiet courage of these two individuals.

At times it was a bit overwritten for my taste. Several times I couldn't help thinking how much better it might be were it a novel and the author had a more comprehensive knowledge of the material.

I can imagine Anthony Doerr for example writing a fantastic novel set in a zoo during WW2! I'm curious now what the film will be like.

View all 14 comments. An interesting but poorly told story overall The writing at times was interesting for a period then would struggle to keep my interest, with me re-reading some parts because I forgot what I had read that quick.

Not a horrible book but could have been done better, in my humble opinion. Shelves: challenge , a-to-z , around-the-world , audiobooks , animal-characters , nonfiction-history , stand-alone , libraries , veterans-and-uniforms , nf I was surprised how much I enjoyed this book.

I'd been vaguely interested in it because of the WW2 angle and from my friends' reviews, but have been putting off reading it for awhile.

I mostly read via the audiobook from the library, and the narrator was one of the best I've ever listened to. That's partly what helped the book gain a five-star rating.

I was a zoo aficionado as a kid. I loved zoos so much that my family had a national zoo membership and we did zoo tourism.

So all the zoological detail in the book was really interesting and vivid to me. Then all the WW2 stuff just had me on the edge of my seat.

The sheer odds against this couple were overwhelming, and I kept expecting horrible things to happen which they did, of course, but not as horrible as they could have been.

I loved all the Resistance details! Highly recommended. Top charts. New releases. Die Frau des Zoodirektors minutes Drama.

Add to Wishlist. Polen Doch ihre friedliche Welt wird urplötzlich zerstört, als die Nazis in das Land einfallen. Sie riskieren alles, als sie heimlich dem Widerstand beitreten und auf dem Gelände des Zoos hunderte von Menschen vor den Nazis verstecken — und so vor dem sicheren Tod retten.

Director Niki Caro. Writers Angela Workman.

Frau Des Zoodirektors

Frau Des Zoodirektors - Inhaltsangabe & Details

Dabei wird er angeschossen und gefangen genommen. Im April wurde die Auflösung des Gettos beschlossen - doch die Bewohner wehrten sich. Anfangs idyllische Bilder des Zoologischen Gartens werden später mit denen seiner Zerstörung und grauenhaften Darstellungen des Warschauer Ghettos kontrastiert, und auch die filigran gezeichnete Figur der Antonina erlebt krasse Gegensätze. Er stellt den Jungen zur Rede, der behauptet, dass sein Vater in Zalesie sei. Voransicht senden. Sie retten ihnen damit das Leben. Und ablenkt. Er betrifft sie auch persönlich: Sie müssen nun an den Chefzoologen Lutz Heck Daniel Brühl berichten, Bakugan Stream von den Nationalsozialisten ernannt wurde. Die Frau des Zoodirektors. Gibt es auch bereits zahlreiche Geschichten über das Warschau während des Zweiten Weltkriegs, von denen sich die meisten insbesondere auf das berüchtigte Ghetto fokussieren, sind längst nicht alle erzählt. Und irgendwo in der Ferne trompetete das verängstigte Elefantenbaby Tuzinka. Es basiert auf einer wahren Geschichte und wurde auch verfilmt. Jan macht sich Sorgen um Antonina und den kleinen Sohn Ryszard, doch sie können die Stadt nicht verlassen. Später bringt Antonina das Mädchen Teresa zur Welt. Bei zwei alten Damen fanden Antonina link ihr Sohn Unterschlupf. Eine Filmkritik von Marie Anderson. Frau Des Zoodirektors

Frau Des Zoodirektors Kommentare

Das Ehepaar geht zu Heck und schlägt ihm vor, im Zoo eine Schweinezucht zu visit web page, um die Soldaten zu ernähren. Die Frau, die vorausgeht Antonina Zabinska Oh Jeihr Mann Jan drei Jahre später. Click at this page den gekürzten Teilen vermute ich allerdings weitere schreckliche Erlebnisse und Situation, welche bei mir eventuell Emotionen hervorgerufen hätten. Im polnischen Urwald von Bialowieza seit ein Nationalpark waren diese ausgestorbenen Arten einst zu Hause. Leserstimme abgeben.

Frau Des Zoodirektors - The Zookeeper's Wife

Insbesondere wenn Heck im Haus ist, wird es gefährlich. Whale Rider - Arthaus Collection. Ich habe mal gehört, dass Menschen keine Bücher lesen wollen, die schwere Kost wie dieses beinhalten, weil ihr Leben eh schon schwer genug ist und man lieber in der Fantasie ein Happy End erleben möchte.

2 Replies to “Frau Des Zoodirektors”

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